Books I Plan to Read This Year: Spring Update #MustReadin2018

mustreadin2018

In January, I joined Carrie Gelson and many other bloggers in creating #MustReadin2018 reading lists. To add a twist to the challenge, I crowdsource my list, selecting one title from each blogger’s list to add to my own. Crowdsourcing has proven to be a more effective way for me to get closer to completing a #MustRead list.

The spring update always means an evening of frantic reading in an attempt to finish another book or two. So far, I’ve completed 5 of the 22 books on my list and started 3 more.

mochi queen

Jasmine Toguchi Mochi Queen is the first in a welcome new series about a spunky Japanese-American girl. In this story, Jasmine wants to help her family prepare mochi, a special Japanese sweet made to celebrate New Year. According to family tradition, she is both too young and the wrong gender to be able to help with her preferred task, pounding the rice. The story felt a little underdeveloped to me, and I wasn’t entirely engaged by Jasmine’s conflict, but I will read more in the series.

#notyourprincess

#NotYourPrincess is a strong collection of profiles, essays, poems, photographs, and art by young Native American women. A good introduction especially for those who want to learn more about indigenous activism and an important book, though it did leave me wishing for more content and more depth.

empower john spencer

Empower makes the case for student empowerment over student engagement and encourages teachers to rethink their role in the classroom and find ways to turn over the reins to their students. A quick and inspiring read that provides plenty of stories from the authors’ own teaching and learning experiences. I really liked all of the sketches, stick-figure drawings, and hand-drawn infographics that illustrate or express key ideas. If you already incorporate Genius Hour, 20% time, Wonder Weeks, or Maker Spaces into your classroom, this book probably isn’t for you. But if you’re wanting to make some changes and just need a little push, Spencer and Juiliani are encouraging mentors.

disrupting thinking

Disrupting Thinking probably isn’t a must-read for those who are familiar with Beers and Probst’s other work (it repurposes some of the claims and strategies from their other books), but it provides a quick and necessary reminder about why we read (to change ourselves, to change the world) and how we should be teaching reading. The Turn & Talk questions at the end of each chapter are rich and provocative and make this an especially good text for teachers to read and discuss together, and if their administrators will join them, all the better. I hope to write a longer review of this title next week.

we should all be feminists

I enjoyed We Should All Be Feminists, an adaptation of Adichie’s popular TED Talk. It’s tiny, yet it packs a punch. Often funny, always insightful, full of interesting anecdotes, it’s well worth the few minutes it takes to read.

9 thoughts on “Books I Plan to Read This Year: Spring Update #MustReadin2018

  1. I need to read one of the Jasmine Toguchi books, new to me, and I will put We Should All Be Feminists on my list, too. Wonder what Gloria Steinem would think of all this women power lately?

    • Linda, I’m guessing that the next book in the series will be a little stronger with more character development. We Should All Be Feminists will take you maybe 20 minutes to read? Probably won’t include anything you haven’t already thought about, but her examples were all interesting to me.

  2. “I wasn’t entirely engaged by Jasmine’s conflict” — I read this as you weren’t entirely enraged by Jasmine’s conflict and that made me want to read the book even more. What is the proper level of rage, I wondered.

    • LOL, it’s a very rare book that enrages me! Although I did have to stop reading Hilary’s book about the election even though it was really fascinating to me because I was SO ANGRY all the time! Now I’m curious about the proper level of rage for a story as well. It’s rather fun to imagine charting inappropriate amounts of rage for the conflicts in your books.

  3. I enjoyed Jasmine Toguchi Mochi Queen although I see your issues with the book, but I liked Jasmine as a character and felt her relationship with her older sister felt authentic. I’m embarassed to admit that I started We Should All be Feminists ages ago and didn’t finish it. Partly it was that the deadline hasn’t arrived, and partly that it’s almost exactly from the Ted Talk.

  4. Jasmine Toguchi titles are ones I plan to get for my library but I haven’t yet read any! They do look like books my students would enjoy. I have almost read Disrupting Thinking. Like many professional reads, I start, read about 80% of the book, think that I should take some notes, put the book down in the stack and there it remains. So silly. As I have really enjoyed this one.

    • Elisabeth’s update is the one that becomes a must-read for me. Sadly, I must admit that I am more motivated because it is crowd sourced and I want to see if she read the book that came from my list. This does not paint me in a good light, but it is kind of like when you recommend the book to someone and you need to know what they think. From this list, I should really pick up We Should All Be Feminists. Carrie, it made my day to read this as I thought I was the only one that did that with professional reading books.

  5. Pingback: It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? #imwayr 4/9/18 | the dirigible plum

  6. Elisabeth’s update is the one that becomes a must-read for me. Sadly, I must admit that I am more motivated because it is crowd sourced and I want to see if she read the book that came from my list. This does not paint me in a good light, but it is kind of like when you recommend the book to someone and you need to know what they think. From this list, I should really pick up We Should All Be Feminists. Carrie, it made my day to read this as I thought I was the only one that did that with professional reading books.

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